Why you should get a seasonal job and live somewhere AMAZING this summer

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Standing on Mead Glacier, Skagway, AK

Working a seasonal job can offer many advantages to working a typical open ended “career” type job.  While you’re never going to get rich, and you probably can’t support a family for very long this way, it can be a great option for single people or otherwise unattached couples.

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Gabby assists Robert, The Brewer

It’s amazing how easy it can be to work a job when you already know the end date. Having an end date prevents you from feeling trapped in your job. By the time you start to get burned out, it’s about time to move on to the next place.

Who says you can only have ten vacation days a year? Most Americans are lucky if they have ANY vacation time to take off from work. Working seasonally offers you the opportunity to schedule a gap between the end date of one job and the start date of the next.  It could be two weeks, or a month; you could even take a season off if you save up enough.

Seasonal jobs are often found in amazing locations. Gabby and I have been able to hike, camp, and hang out with bears in Alaska for the summer; and ski on some of America’s most legendary mountains all winter. You can find job postings around the world on websites such as coolworks.com

Traveling from place to place is half the adventure! I love the opportunity to take a road trip.  After spending the summer in Alaska, we took a road trip down the coast from Seattle to San Francisco.  We took it slow and worked our way down the historic Highway 1, and camped in the redwood forests before finally heading east to Colorado.

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Chances are, once you get to where you’re headed, you’re going to find a lot of other interesting people like you. You’re not the only one who decided to take this journey,  and the ones who do usually aren’t boring people.  You’re going to make great friends all over the world and you’re probably going to sleep on their couch at some point in the future.

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You don’t need to get rich to travel.  All you have to do is save enough money during the season to get yourself comfortably to the next location. The hardest part is taking that first step and leaving your “regular” life behind.

If you have any questions or comments about slow travel, or seasonal work, please feel free to leave them in the box below. Also, you can see more of Gabby’s photography here

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4 Responses

  1. cringing
    | Reply

    ETERNALLY jealous!

    • AdamCharles
      | Reply

      Go for it! Living on the road and working seasonally is an amazingly rewarding experience. All you have to do is take the first step, and you’re already on your way.

  2. photoblogger99
    | Reply

    Glad to see a young guy whose got it figured out. Keep up the good work!

    • AdamCharles
      | Reply

      Thanks man! We’ve got a lot of great adventures planned! We really appreciate you stopping by and checking out Local Nomads.

  3. Emily Bowie
    | Reply

    This is awesome! We’re headed out soon on a similar adventure, nice to hear comforting stories from people who are already successfully nomad-ing!

    • AdamCharles
      | Reply

      It sounds to me like you guys are well on your way! Congrats!

      We’ve been here in CO since November, but we’re about to make our next moves in 2 weeks. It’s totally doable as long as you save enough to get to the next job.

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